Why outsource, when you can just learn the trade yourself?  That’s what Roshelle Stovall Lee asked herself and then proceeded to do just that.  She took her God-given skills, molded them, practiced them and turned herself into the one stop shop that absolutely follows the adage “I can do anything”.  But she is quick to point out, this is HER story, you have to develop your own.  It’s episode #49 of Think Tank of Three podcast.

 

Reischea Canidate-Kapasouris:

There is an old saying, usually by women, there just isn’t enough time in the day. Well, we know someone who read that statement, laughed at it, and sent it home with its tail between its legs. She’s about to school us all on doing whatever you want to do.

Julie Holton:

The climb to the top feels so good when you get there.

Audrea Fink:

Is it just us, or can it feel lonely sometimes, even when you’re successful?

Reischea Canidate-Kapasouris:

And who defines success anyway? What about life’s twists and turns?

Julie Holton:

We’ve learned a few things along the way and we’re ditching the culture of competitiveness.

Audrea Fink:

Bringing together women with different backgrounds to share their stories.

Reischea Canidate-Kapasouris:

Let’s do this together. Welcome to Think Tank of Three Podcast.

Reischea Canidate-Kapasouris:

Hi, I’m Reischea Candidate-Kapasouris, along with Julie Holton and Audrea Fink. We are your Think Tank of Three.

Julie Holton:

You know when people say don’t allow yourself to get too comfortable or boredom will set in, Roshelle Stovall Lee took note. Boredom is not even a part of her lexicon. She is a real estate broker, photographer and graphic artist.

Audrea Fink:

She has a Gamergy entertainment bus for events like private parties and carnivals. She models, she does commercials, while also serving as an HR Manager to a government agency. I’m tired just listening and reading that.

Reischea Canidate-Kapasouris:

Right? And did we mention her number one job of all? She’s a mother of five [crosstalk 00:01:26]. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 boys. Maybe six, depending on the day because she is married, I’m just saying. So being energy constant, I would think is an absolute requirement. How is she getting it all done? And what is driving her? Roshelle, welcome to the show.

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

O.M.G. What an introduction. You guys make me sound good or should I say tired?

Reischea Canidate-Kapasouris:

You make yourself sound good.

Julie Holton:

Let’s leave it a good.

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

No, but really thanks for having me on this show. I’m glad to be on the show.

Reischea Canidate-Kapasouris:

Glad to have you. So the first question it’s basically been posed. How on earth are you doing everything that you’re doing?

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

Well, with a lot of prayer and strategic planning. I’d say on my part, I just do it. It just seems to all work. I’ve been doing this all my life. So I really don’t know anything else or any other way. I’ve always been the creative, business savvy, tech savvy kind of person. Always had a zeal to make money. I think the difference with me is I found a way to keep everything in house and to save money. And that was with me learning how to do multiple things. Most people would look at a lot of things that they need for their new business and figure out how they would hire someone to do this or that. But the way that my mind is and the way that it works, I just say, how can I figure out how to do that? And then save money and then keep the middle man out and keep more profit? And so which resulted in me knowing how to do a wider range of things.

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

I’m not afraid to get in there and learn something. In fact, I’m eager to learn something. It’s because I have a gift to learn and just get it done. I guess.

Audrea Fink:

I love that curiosity mindset that you have. Like, if I don’t know it, I’m going to go learn. I’m going to go figure it out.

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

Yeah.

Audrea Fink:

How do you balance that with being tired? I find I have to be in the right mindset, even if I’m curious. Even if I’m curious, have to be in the right mindset to go dig into something, how do you sustain that mindset?

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

I don’t know, my mind just works weird I guess. And I have this weird amount of energy to sustain it. And it’s something on the inside that was just instilled in me from my parents to always go after what you want, go after your dreams. And they instilled that in me at a young age. And so, the work hard, the work ethic, all of that and the curiosity of how things work. I think all of that encompassed together, it just made me who I am today. And so I just do, it’s just things that I just do and I don’t think about a lot of it. I just do it. And so it’s just the way it is.

Julie Holton:

And you do it with a smile. Like you are just beaming.

Audrea Fink:

Yes!

Julie Holton:

I feel like Roshelle, and I mean this in the best of all ways, we were talking recently on a podcast about how many little girls when they’re young, they think they can do anything. They can be the next president. They can become an astronaut and fly to the moon. And then at some point along the way, the world steps in and says, no, you can’t.

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

No, you can’t.

Julie Holton:

And it seems like maybe you were never told no or you just didn’t ever hear it. You just keep on going. Like what do you say to other women who feel that weight of the world sometimes? Because I think sometimes it’s not even just that we get tired from all the work we’re doing, but we get tired from feeling like we’re hitting those roadblocks or feeling like we’re being told no.

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

Yeah, I have never taken no as the ending point. So I’ve been told no a lot, but I have used those no’s to make me powerful. And so, as a young girl, I remember my mom instilling in me, you can do anything you want to do. I remember my dad telling me that I can do anything. He was like, you have so many great ideas, even as a young child, he was like, that is going to catapult you into something that is astronomical. And so I believed him. I just believed him and I just ran with it.

Reischea Canidate-Kapasouris:

And I think also my co-hosts here. I think you guys probably heard also a very positive attitude towards money.

Audrea Fink:

Yes.

Reischea Canidate-Kapasouris:

We have just had some conversations with other podcast guests, about women specifically and their relationship with money. And when you said your comments, basically, I like money.

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

Yes.

Reischea Canidate-Kapasouris:

I broke it down to a very, mine was not as eloquent as yours. I think you used the word zeal or something, but bottom line was, I like money.

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

Yes.

Reischea Canidate-Kapasouris:

And you’ve channeled that positive energy with the positivity that you have naturally with the curiosity with the positive reinforcement itself and here you are.

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

Absolutely. Yes. Yes.

Audrea Fink:

That’s the formula. Everyone take note.

Reischea Canidate-Kapasouris:

There it is. Show done we solved, the world.

Audrea Fink:

No more podcasts needed.

Julie Holton:

Well someone’s got to make money. So it might as well be Rochelle. Right? Like I love that that idea. And Rochelle too, as you were talking, your ventures all feel connected. So like how did you start to decide? I work with a lot of business owners and one of the things that I talk with them about is knowing when to hire someone, to do something that you’re not good at. But what you bring in to the equation is something very different, which is you have the ability to learn. You have the ability to adapt and to figure out how to fit this next venture into what you’re doing. That’s a very special skillset. So how did you decide? Because it still, I’m sure it takes a lot of decision making you can’t, no one single person can be everything all the time and all the businesses, you have to know the right places to plug in. So how did you develop this eclectic business life?

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

Some things just came about and some things I had to work hard at obtaining, but eclectic is very, is definitely what it is. I consider myself to be eclectic. I am the eclectic one. I am the sum of all of these things that God has given me. That is just who I am had to learn to be okay with that. I had to learn to be okay with the gifts that God has given me. And for someone to be able to do a plethora of things, it can be daunting. And for a while I struggled with being this type of person. And I purposely held myself back because it was like, the highlight was always on me and I didn’t want that. And so I had people coming at me saying, oh, you think you’re all that you can do this. You can do that.

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

And that comes, I mean that gets at you, that gets under your skin after awhile. But I mean, I heard it all. It wasn’t until later. And I learned to own who I really was. And mostly everything I do is self-taught and God given. I’ve literally sat down and studied my craft with trial and error and have been able to be really good at it. And I hate to say a master of my craft, but I’m always learning too. Because I’m always learning [crosstalk 00:09:38] to do better.

Audrea Fink:

Say master of your craft, say it.

Reischea Canidate-Kapasouris:

Let’s just say right now, how blown away I am, but what you just revealed this negative energy that was coming at you about people feeling however they felt some sort of way. Because I was on the complete opposite end of that spectrum. When it came to you, I was always like, she’s the coolest person I know. I just really want to be your friend. I am dead serious. You have to understand. So there, to our listening audience, what I was explaining to my beautiful co-hosts is that Roshelle and I have known each other since high school and Roshelle was always without. And she still is, you can see it. I mean, you can’t physically see her right now, but she’s the most laid back, cool person. I mean, I remember our basketball coach, like does anything ever get to Ro? Because Ro would just be like sup? You walked to practice. He’d be like, it’s time for drills. He’d be like, let’s hustle and Ro’s like “I’m coming.”

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

Just walking all slow.

Reischea Canidate-Kapasouris:

You know? So I was just like yeah, she’s so cool. So to hear that there was any kind of doubt in you. It’s just like what, no.

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

Yes. I mean, just as women, a lot of times we put each other down and it’s just not good. And so for that reason, I didn’t have a lot of women, friends. I hung around with guys a lot. I hung around and I had all brothers, I didn’t have any sisters. So it was like, I was just more comfortable with guys and all of that. But being that type of person, you really have to have thick skin because you get the darts thrown at you. You get the looks and all of that. And you really have to understand who you are. And it took me a while to understand that and to not allow the things that people were saying or the haters, so to speak, to get to you.

Julie Holton:

Roshelle, you said something that I want to circle back to because we interview a lot of women on this podcast who have really incredible stories. And you’re obviously one of them. And one thing that you said, you pointed out your God-given talents. And I think it’s so important to pause at this for a moment because oftentimes I want to make sure that women aren’t listen to these stories and thinking that they need to be just like the person we’re talking to. I don’t want anyone who’s listening to think that they’re not successful until they open 20 businesses and have five kids, five boys at home like you do. I mean that’s not the point. The point is what you said, that if you feel compelled to have multiple businesses, because that’s what fulfills you, just like it does you, Roshelle. That is amazing. That is what God is calling to you.

Julie Holton:

That is what you should do. If you are someone who is fulfilled with working a nine to five and focusing on family time at home, or focusing on volunteering in your community, whatever it is that drives you.

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

Absolutely.

Julie Holton:

That is what you should do. And I think that’s something that you have done so well for yourself is to not listen to the people who said you were doing too much or thought you could do it all or whatever it was that they had to say with attitude. You focused on what was right for you. And that is so important. I think that’s the biggest lesson of all for any of us to learn in this life is to do what we are meant to do, which is not going to look like the person next to us.

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

Yes. Oh absolutely. You’ve said a lot right there. And I wholeheartedly and I tell people all the time, do you. Do you, be unapologetically you, be authentically you because your story is not going to look like my story. And what works for me is not going to work for the next person. So God put certain gifts in front of each person to do. And he has equipped us to be able to do the things that he wants us to do. So you need to know what God is telling you to do. And you do that. You don’t do what God has told me to do, because then you go way off on a tangent where you’re not supposed to be. And then that it won’t turn out good. So, I tell everybody, don’t look at me and say, oh, I’m going to do what you’re doing. I’m going to do all of that. No, you do what you are supposed to do. And then everyone doing what they’re supposed to do will keep us all out of a lot of trouble.

Audrea Fink:

I love that.

Reischea Canidate-Kapasouris:

Preach, Preach!

Julie Holton:

I want to clap for that!

Audrea Fink:

I love that. I actually, you said that and I want to call myself out right now. We were thinking, when we talked about your intro, I was like, how are you not tired? Isn’t that exhausting that life? Which is utter bull. The reason I think it’s tiring to hear, those aren’t my gifts. And I think we need to stop looking at people in their lives and what they have and thinking like, oh man, if I did that, I would be like, who cares if I did that? My gifts, the ones that are mine, right? That’s going to fulfill me. And even, I think even when we’re not in competition, we’re still comparing ourselves to others. So I love that Julie called out the, you don’t have to have 80 businesses to be successful. Whatever you decide to success is success. But how did you learn to accept that about yourself? Like what would you, what advice would you give to someone who says, I don’t know what my gifts are. I don’t know how to accept this. How did you find that space for yourself?

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

It took some years to figure that out and just living life and doing what I am supposed to be doing. I had to learn how to accept my gifts. And so it’s, I don’t know. It’s kind of hard to explain because it, I go back to someone asking who can do this or who can do that? And then me retracting and not saying anything, but I know that I can do that. I can do that. And I can do that. And then me re saying, I’m not going to say anything. I’m not going to say anything. Nope. I’m not going to do it. But then, again, but early on, I think I was saying, I can do that. I can do that. I can do that. And so I was burning myself out by doing all of these projects and doing all kind of sorts of projects for people, because I was not saying no.

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

And that’s a whole ‘nother thing. The art of saying no. And I had to learn how to do that because when you have a lot of things that you can do and want to help people, and that’s the other thing I want to help. And so I want to be this helper of people and give my gifts to, to people so they can and benefit from them. And so a lot of times I was not, I was not charging for anything. A lot of this stuff I was doing for free..

Audrea Fink:

Oh That hurts me.

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

Free. For free. And yes.

Reischea Canidate-Kapasouris:

Breathe Audrea. Deep breaths Audrea.

Audrea Fink:

I’m Trying. I’m trying.

Julie Holton:

Because.

Julie Holton:

The real struggle, right? To balance wanting to help and making money.

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

Yes, it is definitely a struggle and a balance because of the heart that I have, and I want to help people. And then on the other side, there is the business side as well. And so you have to be able to balance the two and know when to give this as charity. And then when to, Hey, I got to a business, I got to keep the lights on, I got to pay my car note. I got to do this. So, but early on, it was a lot of just giving it away because of just my heart. People come to me and be like, oh, this church needs something or this church or this person, or something, whatever it was, I did that. But I had to learn how to say no, and to start doing my business and getting paid for what I do.

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

I want to go back to the question about the connection of some of my businesses, because it’s probably the number one question I get asked all the time and about the connection, or how did I start off with all of these ventures. But like my real estate business, it really isn’t related to any of my other businesses, but it’s like my bread and butter. It’s what sustains me. And I got interested in real estate when we were purchasing our first home in 2004, and I wanted to get into real estate investing. And when I realized that if I became a real estate agent, I could get a profit from being an agent and make money on the investment side. A light bulb went off and I was like, ding, ding, ding. So with that being like with me being who I am, I was like, I need to get my license.

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

So I started this real estate school and my plan was to get my license and learn everything I could in two years under a broker. And then get my broker’s license and start my own company because I like having my own. So I got my license, pass the exam on the first try and became one of my brokers top salespersons. And I ended up staying a year longer, stayed three years instead of two. And then I took my brokers exam passed on the first time, and then left the company to start my own brokerage. And my Gamergy Game Bus business, it was related to another business that I had. It was a marketing tool for a sports drink company that we had, and it was called Gamergy. And we sold the Gamergy sports drink company. And I kept the bus because I was like, this could be a standalone on business.

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

So the Gamergy Game Bus became a business on its own. That hosts parties, carnivals, school events, all of that. My photography and graphics business they’re closely related. Photography these days is half and half. It like half is taking the picture, the other half is editing. But on the flip side of editing, I do graphic arts. And I’ve been designing logos, flyers, album covers, artwork, marketing materials, et cetera, for years before photography. And so it’s just an added perk. If, as a photographer, I know how to do graphics because I can provide some really cool edited photos or extras to my clients because I have that extra skill. Let me tell you, let me give you an example of how all of this is connected and how one project I just finished last week, how all of that came together.

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

And so a client came to me and he said he was starting a business and he didn’t know where to start, but he knew I could guide him. And he needed everything to get started. And all he had was a name for his business. So I consulted with them and we came up with a direction, I designed a logo, and I began to work on a website. We decided we needed photos. So he wanted photos of him and his slogan on a t-shirt. I made shirts. I took studio photos, edited them, made the website, made the flyers, made the banners, business cards, et cetera. Found a business for his, building for his business. And so now normally most of those things wouldn’t be done, it’ll be done by different entities, but I was able to do all of those things.

Audrea Fink:

So you’re kind of able to be like a one stop shop for clients.

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

Yeah.

Audrea Fink:

Because you have all of these different ventures.

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

Yeah.

Audrea Fink:

And you had mentioned at the beginning, that real estate wasn’t necessarily connected, but it sounds like if you’re finding places for him to put his company.

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

So it, it kind of comes around.

Audrea Fink:

Yeah.

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

In certain instances it will come around to be all connected. Because I will eventually connect them, connect the dots.

Reischea Canidate-Kapasouris:

I cannot wrap my head around the fact that the list of what you’re are doing professionally is so long in and of itself. And then we add five boys.

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

Oh gosh.

Reischea Canidate-Kapasouris:

Five active that somehow have not sucked all of the amazing out of you. You’re and maybe that harkins back to your ability to just move slow, stay cool. Not worry about it. What’s been your family’s role in helping you to achieve everything that you’re achieving.

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

They have been really supportive. My family has been supportive. They’re nothing but supportive. My kids don’t know me any other way. So they just know mom is she’s out there under the car working on the car or because it’s funny because I have a car and I like to accessorize it. And so I did it myself. So I have learned, I go on YouTube and then I research it and then I do all these accessories to my car. And then so Malik, he’s my husband, he’s the other supportive guy. And he’s like, you need to make a podcast of this or a YouTube thing you would do so well. I’m like, stop giving me stuff to do.

Reischea Canidate-Kapasouris:

I’ve got enough, man. You don’t need to keep adding.

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

I’m like, I got enough. He’s always coming up with something say, oh, you can do this. You’ll be really good at this, do this. And I’m like, you do it. You need to do that. God didn’t give me that. He gave it to you, but they are super supportive.

Julie Holton:

What an incredible support system. And, of course, going back to your parents because you were talking about them earlier too. I mean like thank you to mom and dad because they, I mean just the whole system that you have built. It just reminds me of why we created this podcast for the women listening who maybe don’t have that support system. Like we all need someone that’s cheering us on. And even if they’re not encouraging us to do more things like your husband is just having that tribe. But we all also talk about the importance of self care and time for ourselves. You have to take some time for you in all of this. How do you do that? Is there such a thing as balance in your life?

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

Oh yes, I have. That’s another thing that I have learned. I have learned to take time for myself and I take my time. Believe me, I take my time. I will just leave and just be gone for a few hours. I’ll be at Costco. That’s my happy place. So I’ll just be just walking around Costco, touching stuff. That’s what my husband says. You just go into the store to touch things. Especially around this time when they have all the blankets. I just can’t help myself with all the blankets. It’s like, oh, it’s so soft.

Julie Holton:

That, and the samples who can’t waste [crosstalk 00:25:40] a couple hours in Costco samples.

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

They have their samples back. So.

Reischea Canidate-Kapasouris:

I was going to say are they back? Are the samples at Costco back?

Julie Holton:

They’re back. They’re Back.

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

They’re back. Yeah. Yeah. I’m never.

Audrea Fink:

It’s not Costco without samples.

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

I know. I know I’m there at least a couple times a week, but I have a big family. So I.

Reischea Canidate-Kapasouris:

I was about to say, you don’t have a choice. You’re feeding growing boys who like they don’t, it’s like, can I eat what can’t I eat?

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

And I had to put a little lock on my pantry.

Reischea Canidate-Kapasouris:

That’s amazing.

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

I did. I had to put a lock on my pantry because just things were just leaving because. And my food bill is astronomical and I’m like, there’s no way a big 50 pack chips should be gone the next day.

Reischea Canidate-Kapasouris:

There was a movie. It was with, it’s a comedy. I want to say with Matthew Perry and Zach Efron, I can’t even remember the name of the movie is, and the only reason it’s in my head is I literally there’s a scene where they’ve switched bodies or something. So Zach Efron is. His character is like the adult has jumped into his body. And a friend of his he’s gone, he’s staying with like the best friend of who would’ve been an adult. He and the friend comes home and he looks at the countertop on the kitchen and like everything that was in the pantry, everything that was in the refrigerator is just strewn about the countertop. All the packages are empty. Kid is like cheese whizzing cheese into his mouth. And he’s just sitting there and he’s like kind of looking sick to himself. And he is like, oh, I’m so hungry. You have anything else. And he is like, what did you not eat? I don’t understand. You got five of them.

Julie Holton:

Tuesday night, times five. Yeah.

Reischea Canidate-Kapasouris:

Times five. Well could be six, but you’ve got times five.

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

Yes. Yeah. Yeah. Six on certain days. My husband is one of them as well.

Reischea Canidate-Kapasouris:

And then they just, and then they just look at you and they’re like, what?

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

It’s like what they go and they grab a handful of fruit snacks and put it in their backpack and go to school. I’m like, what? No, you get one a day, one. One a day.

Julie Holton:

Roshelle, you’re breaking the mold in so many ways. And we’ve talked about, you know, kind of from the business, a aspect of being unapologetically you, but also as a mom. I mean by today’s quote unquote standards, having five kids is a large family, and a lot of judgements get made there too. As we said earlier, women we’re working on this. I hope. But we tend to make judgements either way. Whether you choose to have a family, whether you choose to have kids or not to have kids, whether you have too many kids or not enough kids. So I mean, is this another area of your life where you’ve just said, I don’t care. What other people say, this is what I wanted to do.

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

Well, it didn’t start off that way. I have a blended family. So, my husband had two kids before we got married. And so I have three biological sons. And so we have that many because we were trying to have a girl.

Reischea Canidate-Kapasouris:

I was, I thought so

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

So I said, it’s all your fault. You don’t have that gene. I said, so we are not trying again. God just wanted us to have five boys. And that’s what it is. And now I have a grandson. So don’t even have to.

Reischea Canidate-Kapasouris:

Stop it.

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

Yeah.

Reischea Canidate-Kapasouris:

Stop it. Oh my gosh. Hot grandma.

Reischea Canidate-Kapasouris:

She’s a hot grandma.

Audrea Fink:

So, mother of five, sometimes six, now grandmother.

Reischea Canidate-Kapasouris:

Badass.

Audrea Fink:

Dare. Yeah. Dare we ask, are you adding anything else to the list or are we going to just like hang out here and bask in the glory that is you right now?

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

Well, there’s, I think as long as I’m breathing or living, there’s always going to be more. There’s always going to be something because God always gives me ideas or things to help people. I think that as I older, it’ll just come across differently. So it’ll probably be given to my kids or to grandkids or something like that. But I think he’s forever talking to me, he’s forever talking to everyone. It’s just, we need to tune in and listen to see what he has for us. And so, yeah, there will be something else.

Reischea Canidate-Kapasouris:

And we will be following to figure out what that next something else is.

Audrea Fink:

For sure.

Reischea Canidate-Kapasouris:

So awesome. Roshelle, I just, I think Audrea said it perfectly basking in the glory that is you. It just works so well. I thank you so much for taking the time to, to share your story with us today. However, we’re, we’re not quite done yet. We do have what we call our rapid fire questions. And this is when we just go to you with your quick response. Whatever first pops into your mind with regards to advice for any of our listeners out there. So are you ready?

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

Okay, let’s go.

Reischea Canidate-Kapasouris:

All right. Is there a lesson that you have recently learned that you wish you had learned earlier in your career?

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

Yes. It’s to be me, be on a unapologetically me, everyone will adjust. And there are so many times when I try to not stick out or try to do what others thought I should be or wear my hair a certain kind of way. That’s a whole ‘nother topic to be acceptable in the corporate world, but just be unapologetically you, people will adjust.

Audrea Fink:

From the lessons that you’ve learned. What advice would you offer to any woman?

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

You are not less than, you are fearless, and can accomplish things beyond your wildest imagination, with faith and hard work you can make it.

Julie Holton:

In today’s world. What do you think is the most important skill for a woman?

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

That’s a good one. Adaptability in today’s world. You have to be able to switch and pivot at any given moment. This world is changing fast and we need to be able to adapt to the changes that life springs. We don’t have time to sit and moan and groan about it has happened or why this did happen or did not happen. When the time comes to adjust. First, you have to first recognize that a change has come and you need to really adjust quick and switch it up to fit the times that we’re in. And we are always in a constant state of change, whether we know it or not.

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

And so it’s like, have you ever been asked, how did I end up here? And it’s just little small, sometimes unnoticeable changes over a period of time that that led you to see the big change where you are now. And you can’t see the change that you’re in until you step back and look at it over a period of time. So, sometimes when change comes the change, doesn’t line up with our own agenda and what we plan. And we wind up feeling in our feelings a little bit, but we have to adapt to it because change is inevitable. But the good thing is we were made to adjust.

Audrea Fink:

I love that. Would you mind sharing the best way for our audience to connect with you if they have questions or if they have business interests or if they need a party bus?

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

Yeah, I have my email. It’s I.Roshelle.Lee@gmail.com. And it’s Roshelle, R O S H E L L E Lee, L E E. I am on Facebook under Roshelle Stovall Lee and Instagram at Creative Imagery.

Audrea Fink:

Following now.

Reischea Canidate-Kapasouris:

She’s very quick. She’s very quick to get on it. Roe it has been an absolute pleasure. Thank you so much for joining us today.

Roshelle Stovall Lee:

Thank you.

Reischea Canidate-Kapasouris:

And this has been the Think Tank of Three.

Audrea Fink:

If you have topics you’d like us to cover, or guests you’d like to hear from, send us a message at thinktankofthree@gmail.com. Subscribe to the Think Tank of Three where ever you get you listen to podcasts and connect with us online. We blog weekly at ThinkTankofThree.com.

Julie Holton:

Follow us on social media. You can find us individually on LinkedIn and as Think Tank of Three on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook. Women, click to join our private group on Facebook, where we can all share advice and articles.

Reischea Canidate-Kapasouris:

And if you liked what you heard in the podcast, share it! You can find Think Tank of Three on iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher, GooglePlay, Amazon Music and SoundCloud.

 

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Photo of Reischea Canidate-Kapasouris Reischea Canidate-Kapasouris

As with all things that are of true destiny, Reischea Canidate-Kapasouris believes, you don’t find your career, sometimes your career finds you.

Armed with the gift of gab and a natural feel for writing, broadcasting found it’s way into Reischea’s world after she…

As with all things that are of true destiny, Reischea Canidate-Kapasouris believes, you don’t find your career, sometimes your career finds you.

Armed with the gift of gab and a natural feel for writing, broadcasting found it’s way into Reischea’s world after she graduated from the University of Southern California.

Reischea’s television career began in her hometown of Fresno, California, at then KJEO, channel 47. Her experience at the CBS affiliate was
invaluable; as she worked her way up from a sports intern, to sports producer/reporter, to full-time weekend sports anchor/reporter. That
experience propelled her to San Diego as the weekend sports anchor/reporter for KSWB, where she got her first opportunity to cover
professional sports teams on a regular basis in the Chargers and Padres.

In 2002 she was hired as the weekend sports anchor/reporter for FOX 5 WNYW in New York. There, Reischea was nominated for a New York
Local Emmy for her three-part series on “Diminishing African American’s in Baseball” in 2007. She was also given the opportunity to work on the
station’s community affairs show, Good Day Street talk where topics ranged from post 9/11 stress disorders, healthcare, music and more.
In 2008 opportunity knocked again, this time taking her to Bristol, Connecticut to join ESPN. While with the network, Reischea was able to
interview and interact with some of the biggest athletes and stars on the planet, which made for a pretty awesome experience.

After the birth of her awesome son, Agisi, Reischea focused full-time on the hardest job she’s ever had, being a Mom. But the television love never
went away and so she was able to slide in news anchoring with News12 Connecticut for a short time.

Fast forward to the addition of an amazing daughter, Chrisonia, and that center stone in her life, family, proved to be of necessary focus. As a Mom
of 2 and a wife to a phenomenal husband, Alexandros, Reischea has learned the dynamics of life are ever-changing. Now, focusing on her own
self-empowerment, Reischea is taking her experience in broadcast and bridging it over to a new adventure in the podcast world as a co-host on
Think Tank of Three.