ABC is scrambling following Roseanne Barr’s racist tweet about a President Obama adviser — and we should all be taking notes on how companies deal with crisis communications. The star’s tweet led to the eventual cancellation of the show, which generated $45 million for the network in the most recent TV season, according to Kantar Media.

“Roseanne’s Twitter statement is abhorrent, repugnant and inconsistent with our values, and we have decided to cancel her show,” Channing Dungey, ABC Entertainment president, released in a statement following her social media comments.

Since then, channels broadcasting her original series stripped the option from their platforms. And Barr’s representation dumped her. No one wants to be associated with the comedian, who just months ago was on the top of her game with her rebooted comedy, Roseanne.

And now we’re left to see the crisis communication teams representing the network — and all who associated with Barr — scramble, in real-time.
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According to a recent survey  by Thompson Reuters, the biggest challenge for small and solo attorneys is bringing in new business. (No shocker there!) Of the firms surveyed, 41% had yet determined how to address acquiring new clients. (Ok, 41% is actually pretty shocking.) 

The legal market has been trending down or flat in the past few years. For firms that are trying to keep afloat in this market, acquiring new clients and growing current clients is a major hurdle to address. However, it’s not their only challenge according to the survey.
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It is growing more and more misleading to refer to LinkedIn as a “social media platform”. Although it is one of the most popular platforms, it is far from simply a “social” tool. For all of us working in the legal industry, LinkedIn can actually be a powerful tool for us to use, when we apply it with purpose.

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Where do most adults get their news?

They’re not turning on the TV, opening the newspaper, or tuning in to NPR. Not a chance. At least, not as their main source for information. A new survey by Pew Research Center finds that the majority of adults in the U.S. (62%) get their news on social media.

We can debate whether this is a good thing or a bad thing, whether it is driven by Millennials and Generation Z, and even whether it’s a waste of time for consumers who can’t seem to put down their mobile devices, but we will still come back to the same conclusion: if 6 in 10 people get news from social media, then content providers need to have a strong presence on the top social platforms.


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